Procurement Fraud

Procurement fraud is one of the more complex frauds to investigate because there are numerous ways it can be committed. Procurement fraud is the unlawful manipulation of the process to acquire goods or services to obtain and unfair advantage. The process spans the whole life cycle from identification of needs, to the end of a services contract or the end of the useful life of an asset.

There is a wide range of what can constitute procurement fraud, and these charges can be very serious. Contact Philadelphia criminal defense lawyer Brian Zeiger for a free consultation about your procurement fraud case.

 

Most Common Types of Procurement Fraud

  • Bribes: A bribe is usually defined as the giving or receiving of a “thing of value” to corruptly influence the actions of another, most commonly to influence a contract award or the execution of a contract.
  • Kickbacks: A “kickback” is a bribe paid by the contractor after it is paid.  Most bribes in exchange for large contract awards in international development projects are paid as kickbacks, usually 5%-20% of the contract value.

 

Government Contract Fraud

Government contracts law is comprised of all the statutes, cases, rules, regulations, and procedures with which any company must comply to do business with the government (whether municipal, state, or federal). Both small and large businesses contract with government entities. Businesses contracting with the government face rules and regulations in virtually every aspect of making, performing, and eventually terminating a contract with an agency or department.

Since the set of laws and regulations covering government contracts is immense, complex, and constantly changing, it’s usually in your best interests to contact an attorney specializing in government contracts law early in the process.

 

False Claims Act

The federal False Claims Act permits a person with knowledge of fraud against the United States Government, referred to as the “qui tam plaintiff,” to file a lawsuit on behalf of the Government against the person or business that committed the fraud (the defendant). If the action is successful, the qui tam plaintiff is rewarded with a percentage of the recovery.

 

Contact Brian Zeiger

When you need a Philadelphia, Pennsylvania attorney to defend you when arrested and charged with a with a white-collar crime, contact Brian Zeiger. It is critical to have an experienced attorney advocating on your behalf. Brian Zeiger is an experienced criminal defense attorney who will vigorously defend your rights.

An experienced criminal defense attorney can help you determine whether you have any grounds for dismissal of the charges, explore plea options, or represent you at trial. Only someone familiar with the criminal court system and cases like yours will know how good your chances are for a favorable outcome. A knowledgeable attorney will take all of this into consideration, assist you in making decisions about your case, and protect your rights.

Contact The Zeiger Firm today at (215) 546-0340 for a consultation, and let us help you.

 

Sources:

  1. https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/white-collar_crime
  2. http://iacrc.org/procurement-fraud/the-most-common-procurement-fraud-schemes-and-their-primary-red-flags/
  3. https://www.hg.org/article.asp?id=20227
  4. http://corporate.findlaw.com/law-library/the-false-claims-act.html#anchor33818
  5. http://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-charges/white-collar-crime.html
  6. https://www.cips.org/Documents/Knowledge/Chapter_12_Guile%20Procurement%20Fraud.pdf
  7. http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/white-collar-crime-term.html
  8. http://corporate.findlaw.com/law-library/federal-government-contract-overview.html
  9. https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/white-collar_crime